Planning Commission set to vote on Bayview sewer plant project

The Planning Commission is set to vote Thursday on an Environmental Impact Report for a nearly $1 billion renovation project at San Francisco’s largest sewer plant that has drawn objections from surrounding Bayview residents.

Construction plans for the Bayview District’s Southeast Treatment Plant call for half of the existing facility to be renovated. Central Shops, a city-owned maintenance facility on the adjacent block, will be demolished during the construction process to make room for an extension of the biosolids digester plant.

A portion of Jerrold Street, between Phelps Street and the CalTrain tracks, will be closed during the five-year, $939 million renovation and construction of the sewer plant.

That closure has sparked concern among commuters, local residents and small business owners in the area who fear it could impact their businesses and livelihood.

The City will work with the construction companies to provide additional signage to help guide drivers around the construction zone and attempt to avoid peak hours of road congestion when scheduling truck trips, according to the environmental impact report.

Local residents and Hunter’s Point Shipyard committee members have also complained over the years about the intolerable stench that seeps out from the 66-year-old biosolids plant.

However new renovation and construction aims to keep the stench of the facility within the borders of the city-run plant, according to a planning staff report.

Last August, the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission awarded $939 million to two construction companies to renovate the outdated biosolids plant on Phelps Street.

MWH constructors, a water infrastructure construction company, in partnership with WebCor Builders, a San Francisco-based commercial construction that is responsible for current construction of the $4 billion Transbay Transit Center, will be in charge of the renovations.

After the Environmental Impact Report is approved by the Planning Commission, a final approval from the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission will be required before construction can begin in Fall 2018, according to SFPUC spokesman Joseph Sweiss.

Sadie Gribbon

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Sadie Gribbon

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