Free Muni for kids? Seniors should also ride free, too

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“Free Muni for low-income youths hailed a success just months into pilot,” The City, Friday

Reading about how the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency is paying for 30,000 low-income kids in a pilot program to ride Muni free, brings me to question if this program is discriminatory against other low-income folks, including seniors.

It's hard enough for anyone to survive in this expensive city, especially fixed-income, retired older folks.

My district supervisor, Scott Wiener, wants to fix Muni as a priority, so I hope he'll advocate for a pilot program for low-income seniors for which I may or may not qualify, but quite a number of residents certainly will.

Ann Grogan, San Francisco

“'Deja vu all over again' at CCSF,” The City, Aug. 18

CCSF too important to S.F. to loseThe prospect of City College's closure is a sad and complex situation.

For years, CCSF has been taking up the slack, as high schools turn out functionally illiterate students, the ex-convict population with no means of making a living grows, and The City welcomes folks who, like me when I arrived here, want to learn English and improve their lives.

All these challenges need to be taken care of, but not by a Community College. The accreditation commission made that clear in 2006 and it made that clear in 2012.

Now, we have so many attendees, educators, and union members dependent on these extra programs, that it would be nearly impossible to find the will and the financial resources to reform the college to accreditation standards.

Amarcy D. Berry,San Francisco

“City falling behind on ambitious goals to reduce greenhouse gas emissions,” The City, Tuesday

We foot the bill twice on emissions

Well, duh!

With Muni routinely allowing countless buses to idle every morning for no good reason and oblivious city employees sitting on their butts in their parked, taxpayer-funded vehicles for extended periods of time with the engines running, it's no surprise that the greenhouse gas tally is still bloated in The City.

I don't expect this kind of behavior to change as long as the rest of us are paying the price.

Carl Hoffman, San Francisco

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