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Board rejects Trinity Plaza deal

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A 1,900-rental apartment development slated for Market and Eighth streets has met with resistance at the Board of Supervisors.

Project developer Angelo Sangiacomo intends on demolishing the existing rent-controlled Trinity Plaza apartment building, which houses 360 tenants, to make way for the larger development. Earlier this year, Supervisor Chris Daly, whose district includes the four-acre site, helped broker a deal with the developer to place the 360 tenants in the new complex under The City’s rent control rules. At the time, the deal was expected to quell any opposition to one of The City’s largest housing developments.

The Board of Supervisors rejected on Tuesday a general plan amendment that would have allowed the development to move forward, pending other approvals.

“Some members of the board seem to be working to see if there’s other things that can be done,” Daly said after the vote. When asked if the board’s decision jeopardizes the development, Daly, who was up for re-election Tuesday, said, “I am going to get another four years on the Board of Supervisors and we will have this all worked out before you know it. But if I lose, then maybe.”

Supervisors Sophie Maxwell and Jake McGoldrickhave spearheaded the push to hold up the development. The two sit on the Board of Supervisors Land Use and Economic Development Committee, which is charged with holding hearings on the proposed development before the full board can take a vote on it.

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“I ask that you vote [the general plan amendment] down so that it can go back to the planning committee,” Maxwell said to the board members. “There have been sufficient questions raised about this huge project that I think it warrants more time.”

McGoldrick wants to see more below-market-rate units added to the project — 15 percent not the proposed 10 percent — and he also has suggested the developer pay for new open space in the area. The no-vote puts the development in “a holding pattern,” McGoldrick said.

jsabatini@examiner.com



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