Categories: NFL Sports

49ers look at nonpublic funds

After a recent controversy over plans for a new stadium, San Francisco 49ers officials announced Tuesday that they are exploring ways to pay for the facility without using $100 million in public money.

Separately, Supervisor Sophie Maxwell introduced legislation that reaffirms the project complies with the “will of the voters.”
Both moves come after recent reports that Mayor Gavin Newsom’s administration had asked state Sen. Carole Migden, D-San Francisco, to carry legislation that would allow a judge to decide whether a different stadium plan complied with the plan voters approved in 1997, which set aside public bonds for the construction of the facility.
At that time, voters narrowly approved the idea of a stadium and mall combination. The 49ers are now looking at options that include housing.

Critics charged the move was an end run around the will of the voters, while Newsom’s administration said it was simply a way to clarify whether the project met the will of the voters before extensive planning got under way. Newsom, who is on vacation this week in Mexico, said he would never do anything that might contradict the will of the voters.

If the 49ers ultimately take the public money off the table, it would render moot the discussion of whether the new stadium plans are in line with the voter-approved project.

“We know that the public would like us to avoid using the approved bonds, and we will continue to look at options to see if that is possible,” Lisa Lang, 49ers vice president of communications, said in a statement.

Supervisor Sophie Maxwell’s legislation, which was crafted in concert with the Mayor’s Office, states the Board of Supervisors will have final say on whether any project at Candlestick Point is consistent with the voter-approved ballot initiative.

The bill also reaffirms the stadium will go through an environmental review and there will be reviews before various public boards and commissions — something any stadium project already must do.
“It is one more safeguard to make sure these disclosures occur,” Maxwell said.

SF Examiner
Share
Published by
SF Examiner

Recent Posts

What I am grateful for on this Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is a few days away, and soon we will gather with friends and family to eat and give thanks.…

7 hours ago

Residents face eviction after federal lawsuit shuts down state’s largest sober living provider

More than 250 residents of California’s largest sober living provider could face evictions on Monday, after a trustee who has…

8 hours ago

USF basketball’s Jamaree Bouyea returns home for a resounding win over LIU-Brooklyn at Cal State Monterey Bay

SEASIDE, Calif. — Two minutes and 17 seconds after entering Sunday's game against LIU-Brooklyn, University of San Francisco sophomore Jamaree…

13 hours ago

SF street safety advocates urge public to stop calling crashes ‘accidents’

Neeti Chokshi was crossing the street with her one-year-old dog on an evening in January when a car blew through…

13 hours ago

Victorian Christmas in full swing at Dickens fair at the Cow Palace

Charles Dickens, greeting guests in his home at the Great Dickens Christmas Fair in its first weekend at the Cow…

14 hours ago

USF Basketball: Dons women edge Cal Poly under clear skies in Seaside at Cal State Monterey Bay

 SEASIDE, Calif. -- University of San Francisco freshman Julia Nielacna scored just seven points in the first half on Sunday…

16 hours ago